Mandarin - English Dual Language program

  • Mandarin Dual Language student working on a writing assignment

    CHCCS stands out as one of the first public school districts in the United States to host a Mandarin dual language program, a pioneer in the move to meet the future of language learning and international relations in the United States in this continually growing global market.

    The CHCCS Mandarin Dual Language program is offered at elementary level at Glenwood Elementary School and at middle school level at Phillips Middle School.

    This program is open to all students residing in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district, and transportation is provided to the students in the program.

  • Important information about the CHCCS Mandarin-English Dual Language program that you will find in this page

    Application process:

    • For kindergarten
    • For 1st grade
    • For 2nd through 8th grade

    Curriculum & Instruction

    Frequent questions

    • For elementary school
    • For middle school
    • For high school
  • Why Mandarin?

    Through our dual language program, students have access to a world-class education that prepares global citizens who are bilingual, biliterate, and bicultural – ready to thrive in a dynamic, competitive workforce.

    Mandarin is the most widely spoken language in the world, with approximately 16% of the global population speaking Chinese. Additionally, China is already the world’s second biggest economy and one of the largest trading partners of the United States.

    The study of Mandarin stimulates the mind and improves math and problem solving skills.

  • How Does It Work?

    The CHCCS Mandarin Dual Language Program uses a 50-50 model, which means that core instruction is provided approximately 50% of the time in English and 50% of the time in Mandarin. Students are instructed in one room by an English-speaking teacher, and in another by a Mandarin-speaking teacher. Students move between the two classrooms for instruction, spending half the day in each room to ensure they study both languages daily.

    This research-based program model helps students learn and grow in content knowledge and skills as well as literacy and language proficiency.

  • Is Dual Language Right for Us?

    Research on the benefits of the dual language program shows that all students benefit!

    Scholars such as Thomas & Collier, Beeman & Urow, and others, have published the benefits of dual language programs across race, language, and socio-economic categories. Here are some of the benefits, as cited on the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction website.

    Children reading books in the media center - Higher academic performance compared to students in non-dual language programs

    - Greater mental flexibility and creativity

    - Positive cross-cultural attitudes

    - Potential to receive the Seal of Biliteracy on their transcript upon graduation of high school

    - Enhanced career opportunities later in life

  • What happens after elementary school?

    Mandarin dual language programming continues in middle school at Phillips Middle School with one class each year. Students take Advanced Chinese during an elective period. In this class, students focus on reading and writing.

    The CHCCS Mandarin Dual Language program does not officially continue in high school. Students receive credit for Mandarin 1 and 2. They generally place into Mandarin 3 or 4 in ninth grade. Students may be also eligible for the Seal of Biliteracy on their diploma upon graduation.

  • Meet Flora

    Former student Flora A CHHS graduate, and Mandarin dual language alumna, Flora is a student at Oberlin College, double majoring in Chinese and music.

    “The MDL program has pushed me to work harder than I ever have before. Without this opportunity, I would not be where I am now.”

Application Process

  • Rising kindergartners enter the dual language programs by lottery and are automatically eligible for reentering in subsequent consecutive years. First graders may enter on a first-come first-served basis. Second graders and older can join the program, per availability, by passing a placement test. Graduates of the dual language program, or those who demonstrate language proficiency, may continue Mandarin studies as an elective at the high school level.

  • Kindergarten  

    Applications

    Applications for the 2020-2021 academic year are accepted from Monday, February 3, 2020 until 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15, 2020.

    The application process for the dual language program is a part of the general enrollment process for the school district. General enrollment begins online and includes a section that is dedicated to dual language. Please ensure that this section is complete and accurate. Families will then need to visit the district’s Enrollment office to submit the required paperwork.

    All interested families, including those with preference (see below), should ensure that their enrollment in Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools is complete by the 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15, 2020. Applications received after this time will not be entered in the lottery and will be placed on the waiting list in chronological order.

    The Kindergarten lottery will be held in the week following the ending date for application submission.

    Notification

    All Kindergarten lottery applicants will receive notification by email, of acceptance or waitlist status. As seats become available, parents will be contacted by the office of the Dual Language Coordinator to determine if they are still interested in placement. Parents have two weeks from the date of notification to confirm acceptance. After that period, the applicant will remain on the waitlist, and the next student on the waitlist will be contacted. 

    Placement

    Students accepted in the CHCCS Mandarin Dual Language program will be placed at Glenwood Elementary.

    Transportation

    Applicant transportation preferences are submitted to the transportation department, who sets bus routes. Bus routes cannot be changed during the school year. Applicants who enter the program later should work with the transportation department on a potential transportation plan. Transportation is not guaranteed after routes are set.

For First Grade

  •  1st grade

    Applications

    First grade students who are new to the district should complete a general enrollment form, available at the district office or online at the district’s Enrollment page. Parents should ensure that the dual language section of the registration is accurate and complete. Current CHCCS first grade students may also apply, using the application form.

    Applications for first grade are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Once applications are processed, students are placed in the program, depending on the number of seats available. The remaining students will be placed on the waitlist. As seats become available, parents will be contacted by the office of the Dual Language Coordinator to determine if they are still interested in placement. Parents have one week from the date of notification to confirm acceptance. After that period, the applicant will remain on the waitlist, and the family of the next student on the waitlist will be contacted.

    Transportation

    Applicant transportation preferences are submitted to the transportation department, who sets bus routes. Bus routes cannot be changed during the school year. Applicants who enter the program later in the year should work with the transportation department on a potential transportation plan. Transportation is not guaranteed after routes are set.

For 2nd - 8th Grade

  •  2nd to 8th grade

    Applications

    Applications for grades two through eight are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Applicants should use the English or Spanish application form.

    Students entering the CHCCS Dual Language program in grades two through eight are typically native speakers of Mandarin. Native English speakers may also apply, provided that they have academic background in the language in a similar program or have studied in a country in which the target language is the language of instruction.

    Applicants for grades two through eight must take a language/literacy assessment to qualify for placement. The assessment evaluates speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to determine whether students have sufficient language skills to access science, math, or social studies content taught in the target language. Once general enrollment is completed, the dual language office coordinates the scheduling of assessments. Assessments are only administered to students who are enrolled with Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools at the time of the assessment. Following the assessment, parents will be notified of the assessment results by the office of the dual language coordinator.

    Students who qualify are placed in the program. Should there be more qualified applicants than seats, the remaining qualified students will be placed on the waitlist, and will receive a notification letter, which includes information about waitlist status. As seats become available, parents will be contacted by the office of the dual language coordinator to determine if they are still interested in placement. Parents have one week from the date of notification to confirm acceptance. After that period, the applicant will remain on the waitlist, and the family of the next student on the waitlist will be contacted.

    Transportation

    Applicant transportation preferences are submitted to the transportation department, who sets bus routes. Bus routes cannot be changed during the school year. Applicants who enter the program later in the year should work with the transportation department on a potential transportation plan. Transportation is not guaranteed after routes are set.

Curriculum & Instruction

  • Children presenting in a classroom and student working with legos

    In the CHCCS Mandarin-English Dual Language program, the instructional day is organized with at least half of the instructional time in Chinese. This is called the 50-50 model and is implemented at Glenwood Elementary School. CHCCS Mandarin-English Dual Language students in K-5 study social studies and math in Mandarin

    Instructional Design

    The Dual Language program in Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools implements research-based and evidence-based approaches in instructional design that help students to learn and grow in content knowledge and skills as well as literacy and language proficiency.

    Instructional Standards

    School Supplies in a Art Clip As in all CHCCS classrooms, our curriculum is based on the Common Core State Standards for language arts and math and the North Carolina Essential State Standards for social studies, science, and electives. Content and literacy are integrated in each unit of instruction. All instructional units include standards, transfer goals, enduring understandings, essential questions, as well as details about what students will be able to know and do by the end of the unit. 

    Instructional Practices

    Lessons in both languages are organized into arcs that last several days. Arcs integrate content and literacy skills and are designed to build students’ oracy and background knowledge, reading comprehension skills, writing skills, and word study. Each lesson includes high-yield strategies, including higher order thinking skills, summarizing, vocabulary instruction, advance organizers, and non-verbal representations.

    The Bridge & Language Transfer

    Arrows shows the bridging Each unit includes a bridge, which takes place close to the end of the unit. The bridge is the instructional space in which the teacher explicitly engages students in comparing and contrasting both languages to help deepen their understanding and provide an opportunity to transfer their new knowledge and skills from one language to the other.

     

    Assessment

    Arrows showing test results All instructional units include assignments, quizzes, tests, as well as other kinds of assessments. Many units also include performance tasks that require real-world application of concepts and skills taught. Assessments are normally in the language of instruction (Spanish, Mandarin, or English), with some exception for End of Grade tests and other tests sent by the Department of Public Instruction. Standards-based student report cards reflect student learning and progress in both languages.